Reaver blog 3-Outer torso

With the legs done, it’s on to the main torso.  Parts wise there aren’t many,  but they are huge. The are a mix of large single plates and the hull. My aim was to paint them in bits then assemble them. I kept the white/grey as the primary colour, with the blue as the accent.

The hull is made into 2 large sections that needed painting.  The front has the shoulders, forward hull and interior. The rear has a solid block of the rear armour and back of the interior.

Assambling the front section is a mere 4 parts. 2 Hull and 2 shoulders. The shoulders were pinned with same brass rod as the legs. The jb weld was used to bind these. On to this are 5 armour plates. 2 shoulder, 2 cowl parts and a massive top part. The top hull is not be glued into place. The rest, due to their size are jb welded into place.

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The beauty of these parts is i could work on them individually. This allowed the build to be manageable.
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In between the legs and torso is a 2 part waist and this has (more) pistons. This was treated as a separate part. For the waist armour, I went with the blue. This increase the colours nicely balancing the white.

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The main ‘block’ of the front armour was done in the same way as the legs, with armour in blue. I did the interior at the same time, but I added extra details to this as well.

Speaking of which, the sides of the interior also got done. They are odd parts but suprisingly fun to paint. The include the arm gun sevitors. These poor wretched creatures are great fun. They remind my of the film the chronicals of Riddick. All twisted and pained.

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One issue I found with the airbrushed paint is that it is very soft. To combat this I used Vallejo matt varnish applied via the airbrush. This allowed me to ‘build’ layers were needed.

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The trim took an age to get rights, largely due to the scale of each part.

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The big rear section was built in 8 parts. The main back part is in 3 parts, then 4 void sheilds and the engine cover.

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The engine cover and sheild generators were easy to paint, the big back section is an odd part.

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It is essentially 3 different parts of the titian. The back of the interior, the engine section and the rear armour.

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I painted the engine and rear section together. Once finshed I varnished it, masked it off and did the blue of the armour.

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I also maged up the sockets for the weapon pipes and the carapace weapon mounts.

Once all the parts were done,it was back to assambling. It was all stuck together with jb cold weld for the strong bond. Next task is the head and crew.

Once finshed I added some detailing with the titan decal sheet.

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Project blog reaver #1

my last attempt to do a blog on big project didn’t really work. This time, I will be less ambitious. I will let you know how it’s going rather than a step by step. I will also share anything new I learn and any tips I get from other warmongers. 

I started on the legs and  I cleaned up all the legs parts. One lower leg section was miscast so fw sent me a replacement. The rest of the legs were ok. After smoothing them over, I washed them. Someone  had suggested using fairy power spray befor the traditional soak. This has worked wonders and you can feel difference. It’s great to be working with such massive parts again, but it does throw up challenges. 
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I was pleased with the results and now on to sub assembly. I pinned the 2 hip parts using 2mm brass rod as a lot weight goes through the joins. For glue, I am moving away from super glue for the big joins, and using a 2 part epoxy resin. This will take longer to cure, but will form a much stronger bond. I have tried a few test pieces and the bond is incredible!  I used jb cold weld. It is very strong! Cost was around £5 from Amazon. 

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The upper legs are set in slight stride to help balance and I wanted a more shooting pose so less leg action is better.  

On a quick I have found that my twin long ranged option is called ‘goth’ pattern, and it suits my idea very to have a cool name for the pattern. 

A big part of the legs are all the Pistons, and these will go on last. Everyone says this a nightmare, so not looking forward to this. Thankfully, none of the legs are magnatized, so that’s one task I don’t need to worry about. But there are a lot of them, the toe, ankle, knee, and hips all have Pistons. They need to be trimmed to fit the pose once the legs are set. 

I have made a start on the feet. Cleaning and prepping them. The 8 toes are all Sorted and I have done the toe Pistons. The process was difficult. As the leg position move the feet position, each piston is cut to length. I did these 1 at a time, gluing them into to, but not the ankle armour. This means each toe can be painted separately. The toes are all different. You get 4 ‘side’ toes, then a front left, front right, rear left, rear right. The ankle armour above the toes is also different, front, rear, inside and out. The larger leg Pistons on the to of the armour plates all move and are easy to position. This is areal godsend! Again the ankle armour is not yet attached for paintings. The hip and knee Pistons are easy to set, the hip ones needing more work. 

The leg painting schedule looks a lot of work, but actually should be easy. 


Parts list for painting-legs

Main legs

4 external leg armour plates

8 ankle plates

8 toes (inc 16 Pistons)

2 knees

Groin plate. 

The air brush will get through the these in a hurry, but the trim will be a pain. I want old look to the trim, so I will use a brass base, shaded with both nuln oil and earth shade. The new retributor gold and finish with necron compound. The test peice works really well. The metal areas will also get a antique looks, dry brushed necron compound over a black base, washed in earthshade and re dry brushed, then sepia wash and dry brushed. This gives an nice old metal look, that isn’t rusty.